About Paragard

The IUS that can be Used in Many Women

According to CDC recommendations, Paragard may be used in women with certain preexisting characteristics and medical conditions1
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Proven >99% Efficacy

Paragard is over 99% effective—one of the most effective birth control options available*†
Review Efficacy of
Birth Control Options

Pregnancy Prevention for
Up to 10 Years

Paragard is the longest-lasting reversible birth control method available

Immediately Reversible
Whenever She Decides

Paragard can be removed at year 1, year 10, or anytime in between and patients can
start trying to conceive the same day it’s removed

100% Hormone Free

Talk to her about hormone and hormone-free options. Did you know, over two-thirds of women have concerns with hormones in their birth control, but over 50% of women used them anyway and 52% of women were interested in learning more about hormone-free options?2, §||
Download Paragard Counseling Sheet

High Patient Satisfaction

93% of women using Paragard have reported satisfaction at 3 and 6 months post-placement3
See Continuation Rates of
Paragard and Other LARCs

How Does Paragard
Work?

Paragard uses 1 simple active ingredient—copper—to prevent pregnancy. Copper enhances contraceptive efficacy by
interfering with sperm transport and fertilization, possibly
preventing implantation.

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Important Safety Information

CONTRAINDICATIONS

  • The use of Paragard is contraindicated when one or more of the following conditions exist:
    • Pregnancy or suspicion of pregnancy, abnormalities of the uterus resulting in distortion of the uterine cavity, acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), postpartum or postabortal endometritis in the past 3 months, known or suspected uterine or cervical malignancy, uterine bleeding of unknown etiology, untreated acute cervicitis or vaginitis or other lower genital tract infection, conditions associated with increased susceptibility to pelvic infections, Wilson’s disease, a previously placed IUS that has not been removed, hypersensitivity to any component of Paragard including to copper or any of the trace elements present in the copper component of Paragard. Continue reading

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

Paragard is a copper-containing intrauterine system (IUS) indicated for prevention of pregnancy in females of reproductive potential for up to 10 years.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

CONTRAINDICATIONS

  • The use of Paragard is contraindicated when one or more of the following conditions exist:
    • Pregnancy or suspicion of pregnancy, abnormalities of the uterus resulting in distortion of the uterine cavity, acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), postpartum or postabortal endometritis in the past 3 months, known or suspected uterine or cervical malignancy, uterine bleeding of unknown etiology, untreated acute cervicitis or vaginitis or other lower genital tract infection, conditions associated with increased susceptibility to pelvic infections, Wilson’s disease, a previously placed IUS that has not been removed, hypersensitivity to any component of Paragard including to copper or any of the trace elements present in the copper component of Paragard.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

  • Ectopic Pregnancy: Evaluate for possible ectopic pregnancy in any female who becomes pregnant while using Paragard.
  • Intrauterine Pregnancy: Failure to remove Paragard increases the risk of miscarriage, sepsis, premature labor, and premature delivery.
  • Sepsis: Severe infection or sepsis, including Group A Streptococcal Sepsis (GAS), have been reported following insertion of IUSs, including Paragard.
  • Pelvic Inflammatory Disease and Endometritis: Remove Paragard in cases of recurrent PID or endometritis, or if an acute pelvic infection is severe or does not respond to treatment.
  • Embedment: Partial penetration or embedment of Paragard in the myometrium can make removal difficult; surgical removal may be necessary. Breakage of an embedded Paragard during non-surgical removal has been reported.
  • Perforation: Partial or total perforation of the uterine wall or cervix may reduce contraceptive efficacy and result in pregnancy. Delayed detection or removal of Paragard may result in migration outside the uterine cavity, adhesions, peritonitis, intestinal penetration, intestinal obstruction, abscesses and/or damage to adjacent organs. Increased risk when the uterus is fixed, retroverted or not completely involuted during the postpartum period. If perforation does occur, locate and remove Paragard promptly.
  • Expulsion: Partial or complete expulsion of Paragard has been reported, resulting in the loss of contraceptive protection. The risk of expulsion may be increased when the uterus is not completely involuted at the time of insertion. Remove a partially expelled Paragard.
  • Wilson’s Disease: Paragard may exacerbate Wilson’s disease.
  • Bleeding Pattern Alterations: Paragard can alter the bleeding pattern and result in heavier and longer menstrual cycles with intermenstrual spotting.
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Information: Non-clinical testing has demonstrated that Paragard is MR Conditional.
  • Medical Diathermy: Avoid using high medical RF transmitter devices in females with Paragard.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

  • Adverse reactions reported in clinical trials include anemia, backache, dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, expulsion (complete or partial), prolonged menstrual flow, menstrual spotting, pain and cramping, and vaginitis.

Please see full Prescribing Information

References:
1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Summary Chart of U.S. Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use; 2017.

2. Data on file. CooperSurgical, Inc.

3. Diedrich JT, Desai S, Zhao Q, et al. Association of short-term bleeding and cramping patterns with long-acting reversible contraceptive method satisfaction. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2015;212(1): 50.e1-50.e8.

*Excluding sterilization.

Among typical couples who initiate use of a method (not necessarily for the first time), the percentage who will not experience an accidental pregnancy during the first year if they do not stop use for any other reason.

Paragard must be removed by a healthcare provider.

§Based on a December 2020 web-based survey of women aged 18-45 (n=1,062) who currently use birth control, or plan to use birth control in the next 12 months. This survey was given 12 times over 1 year with no repeat respondents in the past 6 months.

||Based on a 2016 web-based survey of women in the US aged 18-34 years (N=3,020).